August 3, 2015

Florence Naranjo ~ Santa Clara, San Ildefonso Pueblo pottery

Holding a polychrome plate by her grandmother, Susana.
photo by Gregory Schaaf


Florence Naranjo was born on October 4, 1921. She is a highly-respected potter, skilled in the matte-on-black pottery style. She has been active since 1940. She has often demonstrated her craft at Bandelier National Monument during the summer.


Our pot is an exception to the usual matte-on-black pottery style she produced


Santa Clara pottery by Florence Naranjo
avanyu water serpent vessel 
San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico 
photo by Styrous®




Santa Clara pottery by Florence Naranjo
avanyu water serpent vessel 
San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico 
photo by Styrous®




Santa Clara pottery by Florence Naranjo
avanyu water serpent vessel 
San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico 
photo by Styrous®



Florence Naranjo comes from the Aguilar family which has a long line of pottery makers; her father was Joe Aguilar, her mother was Rosalie Aguilar. they made their residence at his pueblo of San Ildefonso.   

Rosalie Aguilar (1898-1947) & 
Joe Aguilar (1898-1965)
photographer unknown



Joe Aguilar, was the son of Susana Aguilar—a well-known potter—and is known to have painted pottery for his mom. He was the husband of Rosalie Simbola Aguilar, also a potter, for whom he painted pottery.  He was an exceptional painter.  Kenneth Chapman included him on a list of fifteen men who painted pottery at San Ildefonso before 1940. He has been actively engaged in art and related subjects since 1944. In 1949, he began painting experiments in new directions."   Seymour stated "In 1987 the artist was working in the California aerospace industry doing technical drawings and only an occasional painting for friends."
Rosalie Aguilar was originally from Picuris Pueblo, in northern New Mexico. Following her marriage in 1922 to José Angela Aguilar (1898-1965), they made their residence at his pueblo of San Ildefonso. Although she bore eleven children in twenty-four years, she managed to produce pottery and did an exceptional job at that.  Her son is Jose Aguilar (b.1945) Yellowbird.

The Aguilar Family of Native American potters comes from Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico, United States, consisting of three sisters, Felipita Aguilar Garcia, Asuncion Aguilar Cate and Mrs. Ramos Aguilar.

In the early 1900s, pottery making at Santo Domingo Pueblo had experienced a significant decline. In 1910, Julius Seligman, who worked at the Bernalillo Mercantile Company near the pueblo, noticed the decline. At his suggestion, three sisters, Felipita Aguilar Garcia, Asuncion Aguilar Cate and Mrs. Ramos Aguilar, attempted to revive the dying art. The three women worked together making pottery and their work became known as “Aguilar pottery.”

The Aguilar sisters made traditional polychrome ollas, jars and dough bowls with several different styles of decoration. The painting style for which they are best known was black paint on a white slip or black and red on a white slip, which almost totally obscured the white background. This style was unique compared to the typical geometric forms of Santo Domingo pottery where areas were usually left open of unpainted. This style has become known as “negative boldface” or reverse-painted Aguilar pottery. They also made traditional Santo Domingo types including black-on-cream and black-on-red.

One of her siblings is the famous potter, Reycita Naranjo who was born in 1926. Reycita has been an award winner at Santa Fe Indian Market since 1981 to the present. She has been featured in numerous publications as well.  


Reycita Naranjo (1926-2003)
photo by Rick Dillingham
(1952-1994)



Net links to more info:   
    
Pueblo Pottery Main        
Aguilar Family     
     
     
    
   
Styrous® ~ Monday, August 3, 2015
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